Transportation

Leaded gasoline
Leaded gasoline

Registered users can log in to post comments or submit items for the galleries.

Login Register

There are 3 comments for this item.

Posted by Bob K at 6:06 am (PDT) on Sun April 24, 2016   
I remember when Sonoco used blue dye in their "240" and "260" premium fuels as went the saying "Blue Sonoco".  The low Octane fuel (190) was green as I recall and became bluer as the blend went closer to 260.  It later switched to gold for regular and red for premium in the 1980s along with all other fuel companies.  The purpose of the die was to make it easy to identify what grade of gasoline it was.  Now there are no dies added as they would clog fuel injectors in today's cars.
Posted by Bob Matthews at 12:49 pm (PDT) on Fri April 22, 2016   
Dad in the 1950's always preferred to pull into an Amoco gas station because Amoco gasoline was "unleaded." Wish I'd asked him "how" "what" and "why" but I just accepted it.

Remember the pumps with signs above them saying "leaded" and "unleaded." Always a couple of pennies different.
Posted by freddo30 at 11:10 am (PDT) on Wed April 20, 2016   
Grandma called premium "ethyl" until she died. How about Texaco Sky Chief, that weird red stuff ?  I used leaded as long as I could and even had my '75 Imperial tweaked to be able to use it (it was one of the first to use un-leaded).

Registered users can log in to post comments or submit items for the galleries.

Login Register



Bookmark and Share

Most people find us by word of mouse. Please share our URL,
http://www.bbemuseum.com/museum/ with your friends!
This site is brought to you using 100% recycled electrons.

Total trivia questions served: 2,070,384