Science, Technology & Medicine

The Dolby noise-reduction system
Dolby B, for consumer audio equipment, was introduced in 1968.
The Dolby noise-reduction system

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There are 5 comments for this item.

Posted by Bob Matthews at 11:08 am (PDT) on Sun April 3, 2016   
Same here. What I did find it useful for was boosting the treble on poor fidelity recordings by rerecording with "B" but then leaving it off during playback.

Then came Dolby "C" . . .
Posted by Bob K at 6:05 am (PDT) on Sun April 3, 2016   
Indeed Freddo30.  During the 1980s I was recording both vinyl and CDs to cassette using a Harmon/Kardon cassette deck.  Using CR02 (Chrome) tapes I would challenge anyone to detect the sound difference between the cassette and CD (or vinyl) during tape playback using Dolby B.
Posted by freddo30 at 9:57 pm (PDT) on Sat April 2, 2016   
Thanks for the explanation Bob ; I rarely used it because of the treble reduction.
And you needed it both on -record- and -playback- if I recall correctly. 
Posted by Bob K at 8:39 pm (PDT) on Thu July 18, 2013   
The treble reduction occurred only on heavily marketed inferior quality tape decks.  Dolby B worked very well on quality decks in reducing tape hiss without altering the original audio quality.  However, pre-recorded so called Dolby B cassette tapes never tracked properly due to high speed mass copying and caused significant treble loss during playback.
Posted by Bob Matthews at 4:51 pm (PDT) on Wed July 17, 2013   
To these ears it simply lowered the treble, so of course the hiss was reduced. 

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